Forum Title: How do I put a door here? (see picture)
Hi All, I really need some help here. I am somewhat of a novice at doing things myself. Although, I am a mechanical engineer and design complex machinery for a living. I have placed a picture here to show my predicament. I have a slab house with no attic. I want to put a door in an existing room. I tore down the sheet rock, because the texture was horrible. The picture below is what I found. The wall is 8 ft tall. On the lower part of the wall runs a water pipe (copper) and two electical lines. I was thinking of routing the piping under the door I want to put in by removing some of the slab, running the copper down and then covering it back up with cement. Other than that I don't see many other options. I could run it over the door I guess. Also, to make a turn in a copper pipe like that means cutting and joining somehow. The methods for joining a copper pipe seem to be saudering or compression fitting. I am against saudering because of access and I am wary of doing a poor sauder joint. I guess that's enough said. Here is the picture. What do you think? <img src=http://216.77.188.54/coDataImages/p/Groups/396/396397/folders/296448/2368272DoorQuestion.jpg width=470 height=626> Regards, Jimboy
Category: Windows & Doors Post By: ANNA SANCHEZ (Jonesboro, AR), 01/18/2019

I assume they are asking if the door is right swing or left swing. If the door is opening to the inside of the room, stand outside and see which way it swings. If the door is an out swing, stand inside and see which way it swings.

- KYLE MUNOZ (Coon Rapids, MN), 02/08/2019

How do I put a door here?

- TONI YANG (Vallejo, CA), 02/19/2019

Even if your local Plumbing Code allowed you to use compression fittings inside a wall cavity (doubtful) you would be faced with two solder by compression joints. That puts a chink in your objection to soldering the joints. Learn, or hire it done. On a skill level of 1 to 10, soldering ranks somewhere between two and three. Go overhead. Do not embed copper pipe in concrete. They don't get along. Repair bills (you will need help if it happens) will be up in the thousands.

- GLEN ALVARADO (Champaign, IL), 02/26/2019

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